Symbolism in the road not taken by robert frost

As this person stands looking at the two options, he is weighing the pros and cons in a quiet, studied manner. Nonetheless, that is the way he is going now, and the place he ends up, for better or worse, was the result of his decision. His honesty is a reality check as well as a means of making a final decision.

This poem does not advise. He can only see so far down the first path and took the other Two roads diverged in a yellow wood And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; 5 Then took the other, as just as fair And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that, the passing there Had worn them really about the same, 10 And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black.

Here also, he adopts a middle stand. Thus, one should make their decision swiftly and with confidence. If life is a journey, this poem highlights those times in life when a decision has to be made. It certainly made "all the difference," but Frost does not make it clear just what this difference is.

The popular perception of the poem is that Robert Frost takes one of the two roads he describes. Paths in the woods and forks in roads are ancient and deep-seated metaphors for the lifeline, its crises and decisions. The rhyme scheme is ABAAB; the rhymes are strict and masculine, with the notable exception of the last line we do not usually stress the -ence of difference.

The descriptions of each road one bends under the undergrowth, and the other is "just as fair" indicates to the reader that, when making a life-altering decision, it is impossible to see where that decision will lead.

No one had stepped through to disturb the leaves on both roads. Most common speech is a combination of iambs and anapaests, so Frost chose his lines to reflect this: Oh, I kept the first for another day.

But to contemplate this hypothetical deeply is folly, for it is impossible to say whether taking the other road would have been better or worse: Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both This simple looking poem, mostly monosyllabic, has a traditional rhyme scheme of ABAAB which helps keep the lines tight, whilst the use of enjambment where one line runs into the next with no punctuation keeps the sense flowing.

Ultimately, the reader is left to make up their own mind about the emotional state of the speaker at the end. Any person who has made a decisive choice will agree that it is human nature to contemplate the "What if The poet is the first to encounter this dilemma.

The crossroad functions as an evocative metaphor for a vital decision. Which way will you go. It is the hallmark of the true poet to take such everyday realities, in this case, the sighs of a friend on a country walk, and transform them into something so much more.

Clearly, this is to emphasize that both roads appeared untouched, not having been tarnished by the foot of a previous traveler. Thus, he does not take either of the two roads described, but forges his own path.

Frost also mentions the color black in the lines: All of Robert Frost's poems can be found in this exceptional book, The Collected Poemswhich I use for all my analyses. The greatest evidence for this is Frost himself: Print out the poem.

As for color, Frost describes the forest as a "yellow wood. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: There are four stressed syllables per line, varying on an iambic tetrameter base. Lines eighteen and nineteen expose that he intends to lie, and claim he took the road that was less travelled in reality both were equally travelled.

But life is rarely that simple. The speaker chooses one, telling himself that he will take the other another day. With this poem, Frost has given the world a piece of writing that every individual can relate to, especially when it comes to the concept of choices and opportunities in life.

When making a choice, one is required to make a decision. Though the problem of making a choice at a crossroads is almost a commonplace, the drama of the poem conveys a larger mythology by including evolutionary metaphors and suggesting the passage of eons. But to contemplate this hypothetical deeply is folly, for it is impossible to say whether taking the other road would have been better or worse: What Robert Frost implies here is that the practice of teaching had been made crude by teachers themselves; they did not attend to the profession out of love for the vocation and sincerity in fulfilling their duties.

Analysis of Poem

It is even possible that they are worn the same at the path entrances only and that many turned around when reaching the undergrowth of the first path. In the poem "The Road Not Taken," the two roads in the woods symbolize the choices one makes in life. From descriptions in the poem, the paths are worn about the same, which shows that the choices people make in life are often more random than they think.

"The Road Not Taken" was written by Robert. Shmoop guide to Roads in The Road Not Taken. Roads analysis by PhD students from Stanford, Harvard, and Berkeley The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost. Home / Poetry / The Road Not Taken / Literary Devices / Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay / Roads. Of all Robert Frost poems, none are more famous than “The Road Not Taken.” My analysis of leads to the following observations and queries: The rhyme scheme is a b a a b; The poem uses the well known metaphor of a path being compared to life, and a divergent path representing a choice.

A second analysis: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost is quite a popular poem; unfortunately however, its popularity comes mainly from the simple act of misreading. With this poem, Frost has given the world a piece of writing that every individual can relate to, especially when it comes to the concept of choices and opportunities in life.

'The Road Not Taken' by Robert Frost is a poem narrated by a lone traveler confronted with two roads, symbolizing the journey of life and the decisions we make on that journey. The narrator chose.

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Feb 17,  · In "The Road Not Taken," Frost does not indicate whether the road he chose was the right one. Nonetheless, that is the way he is going now, and the place he ends up, for better or worse, was the result of his turnonepoundintoonemillion.coms: 8.

Symbolism in the road not taken by robert frost
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SparkNotes: Frost’s Early Poems: “The Road Not Taken”